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Recreation, Tourism, and Sport Management

This is a basic library guide for students and faculty in the Recreation, Tourism, and Sport Management Department and will help you with your assignments and research.

RESEARCH WORKSHEET (Recreation 470)

Your first step is to decide what the topic of your research will be and then to develop a strategy for working on the assignment. Also, use your own work or personal experience on the job or in an internship to decide on a research topic.Speak with your professor or other students in the class to determine if your research selection is viable.

Ex. Exercise programs help stroke patients recover faster.  True or False?

Is the topic interesting to you? Is it manageable?  Think about these things before beginning your library literature search.

Think of keywords or terms that you would use to describe your topic.You might read several articles, newspapers, an encylopedia, etc. to get an overview of your subject.
Ex. Use the terms Stroke, exercise, progress, recovery In searching the databases. Found that the medical term for stroke was  "Cerebrovascular Disease" and added the term "treatment programs" when searching for journal articles..

                         LITERATURE REVIEW

Decide what types of sources will help you.  Be sure to consider the reliability of the sources before listing them. Below are some of the sources that could be used. Now make a list of where you want to go and find out if the library owns or subscribes to the resource. Keep track of all the resources that you use. This will save you time

Library Catalog for Books, Media, Dissertations

Library Databases - Click on "Articles"

Newspapers or New York Times

Web Sites Search Google, etc.

                       DATABASES FOR RESEARCH

Academic Search Premier

CINHL with Full Text

Medline with Full Text

SportsDiscus

Continuously review and evaluate the sources you look at that will be used in the final presentation of your research. Provide the correct citations for your bibliography.

                          CITATION HELP

Purdue Owl: Online Writing Lab

Buley Library: Libguide on How to Cite

FIND JOURNAL ARTICLES FOR RESEARCH

SUBJECT SPECIFIC DATABASE

  • SPORTDIScus With Full-Text
    A comprehensive source of full-text journals for sports and sports medicine. Provides full text access to over 550 journals.

SUBJECT RELATED DATABASES

  • CINAHL Plus With Full-Text
    CINAHL database  is a collection of more than 770 full-text journals available for nursing and allied health professionals. 

  • MEDLINE Plus With Full-Text
    This medical database provides authoritative information in the fields of medicine, nursing, health and the sciences. Coverage is extensive with more than 1,400 journals available.

GENERAL ACADEMIC  DATABASE

IS IT A SCHOLARLY OR POPULAR MAGAZINE?

HOW TO DETERMINE IF IT'S A SCHOLARLY ARTICLE OR A POPULAR MAGAZINE? PRIMARY OR SECONDARY SOURCES?

 

The following list will help you identify if the journal is a peer-reviewed journal or a popular magazine.

 

Bibliography:  Scholarly articles include bibliographies,footnotes,or endnotes that help identify additional resources to consult. Also provides you with the references used in the journal article.
Abstract:   
The full text often begins with an abstract or summary containing the main points of the article.
Authors:  
Authors’ names are clearly listed with credentials/degrees and affiliations which are often universities or research institutions. The authors would be considered experts in the field.
Audience:
 The language of the article uses a vocabulary or specialized language intended for other scholars in the field, not for the average reader.
Graphics & Images: 
The graphics are more likely to include tables, graphs and charts that are as important as the article text. There will be few if no advertisements.
Length: 
Scholarly articles are often, but not always, longer than the popular articles found in general interest magazines such as Time or Newsweek.
Peer-Reviewed: Scholarly articles are evaluated by other experts before the article is published. This is called a peer-reviewed article. Journals that review and evaluate their articles will be called peer-reviewed journals.

 

PRIMARY OR SECONDARY SOURCES?

A primary source is a document created by the person such as a speech, diary, letters, dissertation, original research or the results of an experiment.

A secondary source interprets and analyzes the original documents. This can be a recreation textbook, journal article, peer-reviewed journal article.