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Education Policy: Evaluate Websites

Evaluate Internet Sources

Elements to look for  from your internet sources:

Authority

Is it clear who is responsible for the contents of the page?  

Is there a way of verifying the legitimacy of the organization, group, company or individual?

Is there any indication of the author's qualifications for writing on a particular topic?

Is the information from sources known to be reliable? 

Accuracy

Are the sources for factual information clearly listed so they can be verified in another source?

Is the information free of grammatical, spelling, and other typographical errors?

Objectivity

Does the content appear to contain any evidence of bias?

Is there a link to a page describing the goals or purpose of the sponsoring organization or company?

If there is any advertising on the page, is it clearly differentiated from the informational content? 

Currency

Are there dates on the page to indicate when the page was written, when the page was first placed on the Web, or when the page was last revised?

Coverage

Are these topics successfully addressed, with clearly presented arguments and adequate support to substantiate them?

Does the work update other sources, substantiate other materials you have read, or add new information?

Is the target audience identified and appropriate for your needs? 

 Source: http://library.nmu.edu/guides/userguides/webeval.htm